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    Originally posted by Anek View Post
    lpf, I read that some years ago and liked it, but never read the following one(s). If you do, I'd be curious to know what you think!
    I will keep this in mind

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      Finished A Boy and His Dog by Harlan Ellison today, another short read. But unlike my last one, a good and fun one. Read it because it was called an inspiration for the Fallout games and I was in the mood for something post-apocalyptic. Laughed out a few times and read it in one go. Seems to be highly controversial, but I liked it.

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        Richard Matheson - Hell House

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          lofivelcro - I *love* Harlan Ellison. Fantastic short story writer. Highly recommend basically all of his collections. THE DEATHBIRD, in particular, is amazing. One of the best novellas I've ever read.

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            Baston never heard of him before I've read A Boy and His Dog, tbh, but I've only been reading since October. I will check out his other works and Deathbird, thanks for the rec.

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              Since I can never read one thing at a time:
              • The Secret History by Donna Tartt (reading this together with a friend abroad, checking in after every chapter)
              • No Filter: The Inside Story of Instagram by Sarah Frier
              And probably starting Harry Potter and the Philosopher's stone tonight because why not?

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                EveryWorld
                There is no need for a reason to read Harry Potter. It's always a great idea

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                  Anek Exactly my thought! The 20th anniversary special made me ache for a reread.

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                    Right now I am reading "how to win friends and influence people" in preparation for my new job as a waiter.

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                      I've finished The Postman by David Brin and liked it a lot. I'm still pondering the role of females in the book and the society, and what the author wanted to tell with that. I remember seeing the film with Kevin Costner in the cinema, way back with my father and I think it was completely different. I don't remember the super computer from the book and the feminist amazon-scouts. Maybe they weren't in the film? Idk.
                      But the book was a good read, emotional at many points, although the second half was a bit weird. Liked the whole 'fake it till you make it' angle and how a lie can grow to become a truth.

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                        I've finished You are a Badass at Making Money by Jen Sincero. It was mentioned here and because I've never read a self-help book on making money, I was curious. I have a vague idea how to make money myself (hard work, taking chances, luck and connections) if you're not outright born into it and can just go from there, so I was wondering if that book would bring anything new to the table.
                        Not much surprising, it didn't. Well, there was a lot of crude and trendy language you might like or not, I didn't. The core was pretty much the same, but the author went ahead and told her readers that you don't need luck or connections, but hard work and taking risks. And you have love money. You have to be obsessed with money. And believe in the Universal Intelligence, that wants everyone of us to be happy, awesome, and rich. Tbh, it was the kind of esoteric hype-talk that makes me uncomfortable. Towards the end she got heavy on the "hire a coach" thing, telling how she spent 85.000 $ for a coach, and that turned into a theme of sorts. To my disappointment, stories from other people who got from poor to rich were about people who worked in marketing or consulting and just made the leap into internet marketing, facebook coaching, and basically charisma-based talk-trickery to make money. One person got rich because she found a stack of old stocks for a company she once got for 200$ that now after so many years were worth the exact amount of money she needed for her new business. Talk about luck.
                        Like I said, the core principles were there, but hidden under a lot of esoteric money-loving talk and coach-shilling, as well as tons of personal stories and anecdotes. I'm glad I didn't pay money for the book, because I would have felt ripped off.
                        In short, I didn't like it. But it had some value for its entertainment, so that's something, I guess.

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                          Recently finished PROJECT HAIL MARY (Weir) - I thought this had a good story, but the execution of it is kind of annoying. It's essentially a sci-fi survival story, but told with this gee whiz 1950s affect. There are a lot of exciting, interesting things that happen throughout Weir's 476 pages, but the suspense gets undercut by lines like "I'm going to call this a doohickey, I don't know what else to call it" or "I'm a gosh darn scientist!" I'm not saying it needs to be profanity-laden or anything, but it should at least be believable as adult dialogue/internal monologue... Also, no offense intended, but I don't believe a junior high school science teacher knows all the formulas, astrophysics, chemistry, biology, and biochemistry this protagonist knows. I realize it's a book, and we have to go along with this conceit to read the story, but the protagonist is supposed to be essentially an Everyman - nothing extraordinary about him - and yet he seems to have incredibly in-depth knowledge of every scientific field. (That's just a pet peeve, though.)

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                            Finished Deltora Quest #1 - The Forests of Silence by Emily Rodda. Yes, I know, it's a children's fantasy book, but after the Postman I wanted a light read. This one was short, kind of exciting and very likeable. Despite the "heroes" being male, I liked that in two critical instances female characters saved them with quick thinking and good reactions. If I had a daughter, I'd probably give that book to her. I'd give it to my son, too, because the male characters show some good character and integrity as well. No idea how the other seven in the series are, but I'm going to find out.

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                              Something is Killing the Children

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                                Recently finished THE SOFT MACHINE (Burroughs) - I personally loved it, but could easily understand why most other people wouldn't like it. It's foul, offensive, often disgusting, but written with such a bold unique voice I couldn't put it down.

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