Is this workout plan right?

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  • Is this workout plan right?

    Hello, I want to know if this workout planning (and the workouts itself) are right for strength and tone (mostly strength than muscle gain)

    Day 1 Shoulders, chest and triceps + Abs

    Day 2 HIIT

    Day 3 Back and biceps + Legs

    Day 4 Shoulders, chest and triceps + Abs

    Day 5 HIIT

    Day 6 Back and biceps + legs

    Day 7 Rest

    Now, for the workouts...

    Shoulders, chest and triceps:

    Weighted Push ups: 30 secs

    Power Push ups: 30 secs

    Shoulder press: 20 secs each arm (only 1 dumbell T_T)

    Slow Diamond Push ups: To failure
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    4 sets - 2m rest between sets - 20 secs rest between excercises

    Abs

    Flutter kicks: 45 secs

    Pull through: 45 secs

    Scizors: 45 secs

    Leg raises: 45 secs

    Dumbell twists: 45 secs

    Elbow Plank: To failure
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    4 sets - 2m rest between sets - 15 secs rest between excercises

    Back and biceps

    Reverse angels with sandbags: 30 secs

    Back extensions: 30 secs

    Dumbell rows: 30 secs each arm

    Punches with sandbags: 40 secs

    Australian pull ups: To failure
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------
    4 sets - 2m rest between sets - 20 secs rest between excercises

    Legs

    Jump squats: 45 secs

    Lunges: 45 secs

    Assisted pistol squats: 8 each leg

    Calf raises: 45 secs

    Squats: To failure
    ------------------------------------------------------------------
    4 sets - 2m rest between sets - 20 secs rest between excercises

    HIIT: this workout: https://youtu.be/nOQpD8aDJeI

  • #2
    Is everything HIIT? Why timing strength workouts?

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    • #3
      Offhand I think you're kind of all over the place with this.

      So the first issue I see is that this is apparently training for power - as essentially you've made every work out HIIT. This is great and all - but you're probably not gonna be activating much hypertrophy with this.

      Issue 2 - I don't see anywhere near enough rest time here for what you are attempting. This is all mid to high volume (16 to 30 sets per workout), high intensity, AND you want to do this 6 days per week. I don't see how you could possibly avoid overtraining with this short of sleeping 12 hours per day and eating like a horse.

      I think you would be better served with a simpler 2/3 day split and I would lose the HIIT workouts in all honesty.

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      • #4
        Daegan , I saw your post and realized that he probably just followed your advice about time under tension.
        Another random guy I second most of what Daegan said - throw away HIIT, 2-3 sets for building muscle (various rep counts for hypertrophy, higher resistance for more strength). In case you're curious about this whole "time under tension" concept there's a good video explaining it here.

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        • #5
          If you want to mix up you could try like:
          Full-body
          HIIT
          Rest
          Upper being shoulders chest triceps biceps back (push ups and pull ups cover that)
          Lower being abs and legs
          HIIT
          Rest

          You would hit every muscle twice per week and still doing HIIT and rest.
          I dont know if it would work tho could still be too much work still and nutrition would have to be in check.

          And I personally think strength work should be counting reps (good reps) or till failure as for mass watch the video J3ster shared.

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          • #6
            First of all, no, I didnt know that the timing Ive done was HIIT aimed. I just tried to follow the scheme that Thenx uses for his workouts (45s work, 15s rest). And I've splited it into 2 groups of muscles per day instead fullbody, because some days I come home late and some I come early. So if I come at 7pm home, I cant do the workout since fullbody would take like 1h, and I have to do stuff before, and not working out means re-scheduling my whole plan.... and I dont really want to >_>

            Daegan umm, my main focus isn't hypertrophy, as it isn't for calisthenics. Just gaining more strength - without focusing 0% on muscle gain.

            "I don't see how you could possibly avoid overtraining with this short of sleeping 12 hours per day and eating like a horse." I think ive missunderstood this (I hope). 1- I feel empty when I dont do anything when I know I can do 2- I've split on certain muscles so each muscle has at least 24h-72h of rest 3- I think you exagerated with the 12 hours and eating like a horse thing, or maybe you tried to say that even with those habits I wont be enough.

            Ive done this with strength protocol (e.g back and biceps = I add the muscle I get in 2 days, so the muscles get 48h of rest) and honestly I dont feel tired at all, but maybe I dont need to feel tired to know that im overtraining? well, at least I dont feel it

            J3ster Nice video c: ok, I will re-do the workouts today or tomorrow counting reps instead of time. But what do you mean with higher resistance? (btw, I thought hypertrophy looks for 8-12 reps of the weight you can lift just once....)

            Fallback Hmm... I might follow this, thanks!

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            • #7
              Thenx uses rep counting on strength workouts and time counting for HIIT (as everybody).

              You can get a nice full workout in less than a hour Supersizer and Beast Mode for example.

              I think what Daegan meant was that both strength training and HIIT are very demanding and you only had one rest so your body would feel really tired without proper eating and sleep and you could end up doing more bad than good (remember Strength
              ​​​Protocol had lighter days and didn't used HIIT).

              ​​​​​​​Higher resistance is usually adding more weight but since this is bodyweight that can be done with harder exercises or to do them slower.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Another random guy View Post
                umm, my main focus isn't hypertrophy, as it isn't for calisthenics. Just gaining more strength - without focusing 0% on muscle gain.
                Except for bodybuilding (and I'd argue it's not even a sport, but whatever), no other sport focuses on hypertrophy. Like, literally. For most athletes it's just a byproduct. The thing is that you'll get it anyway. Regardless of what you're doing. Even cardio (albeit in very small amounts). 2-3 sets is what you want for strength. But preferably 2. The difference between strength training and hypertrophy-focused training is that in first you should aim for as much muscle recruitment as possible (therefore using highest possible resistance) where as with hypertrophy the goal is to fatigue the muscle as much as possible.

                Originally posted by Another random guy View Post
                J3sterBut what do you mean with higher resistance? (btw, I thought hypertrophy looks for 8-12 reps of the weight you can lift just once....)
                Mind... blown.

                Higher resistance means just that - it's a comparative measurement of how much force your muscles have to produce during a given exercise compared to other exercises. Simply put, it's how hard you have to push/pull. 20 kg dumbbell curl is of higher resistance than 10 kg, and one-arm push-up is a higher resistance exercise than a normal push-up.

                As for you hypertrophy question. There is evidence that higher volume (number of sets) is more beneficial for hypertrophy, however one has to be careful not to overstep into the realm of endurance training when the adaptive response in the form of hypertrophy isn't very pronounced. General consensus is that 3-6 sets is okay. I really prefer 3 sets, but again - it depends on resistance (exercises that you're doing) using lighter variation will allow you to pump out more sets, but probably will not give you as much strength.
                It's difficult to target hypertrophy as a response, because there's no way to directly challenge it and hypertrophy is just one of the numerous ways through which your body may adapt.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by J3ster View Post
                  Except for bodybuilding (and I'd argue it's not even a sport, but whatever), no other sport focuses on hypertrophy. Like, literally. For most athletes it's just a byproduct. The thing is that you'll get it anyway. Regardless of what you're doing. Even cardio (albeit in very small amounts). 2-3 sets is what you want for strength. But preferably 2. The difference between strength training and hypertrophy-focused training is that in first you should aim for as much muscle recruitment as possible (therefore using highest possible resistance) where as with hypertrophy the goal is to fatigue the muscle as much as possible.


                  Mind... blown.

                  Higher resistance means just that - it's a comparative measurement of how much force your muscles have to produce during a given exercise compared to other exercises. Simply put, it's how hard you have to push/pull. 20 kg dumbbell curl is of higher resistance than 10 kg, and one-arm push-up is a higher resistance exercise than a normal push-up.

                  As for you hypertrophy question. There is evidence that higher volume (number of sets) is more beneficial for hypertrophy, however one has to be careful not to overstep into the realm of endurance training when the adaptive response in the form of hypertrophy isn't very pronounced. General consensus is that 3-6 sets is okay. I really prefer 3 sets, but again - it depends on resistance (exercises that you're doing) using lighter variation will allow you to pump out more sets, but probably will not give you as much strength.
                  It's difficult to target hypertrophy as a response, because there's no way to directly challenge it and hypertrophy is just one of the numerous ways through which your body may adapt.
                  J3ster shoot, I meant 8-12 reps of a percentage - that i forgot - of the weight you can lift once

                  thanks to everyone who replied! my questions are answered

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