Mid Term Goals

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  • Mid Term Goals

    Hi,

    long time Darebee "user", first time poster here

    I am looking to create some personal mid term goals which are challenging but doable and I'm not sure where to start. A little background: I worked out almost daily with Darebee last year and had good results but it got less and less as summer came around. I tried to pick up a routine again a few times but didn't stick to it. So no, I'd like to define some goals to keep me at it.

    My idea is to define goals for end of 2017 and use metrics such as number of push-ups/pull-ups/dips/crunches/... First question would be if this is a good idea in general? Second question would be how I'd come up with numbers which are challenging but doable? If the numbers don't add up, I might lose interest because I already achieved them or because I do not feel like I'm able to achieve them at all.

    Any help is appreciated.

    Thanks,
    Sebastian

  • #2
    You could see what's your max rep count in pushups for example and work at it so you increase by say, the end of summer 2017.

    Comment


    • #3
      Welcome to the forums, Sebastian.

      Defining your goals is a great thing and is pretty much a necessity in fast progression.
      While setting goals it's important to keep in mind several key principles.
      Goals have to be SMART:
      Specific
      Measurable
      Action-Oriented
      Realistic
      Time constrained.

      A good example of a goal would be something like "do 20 one arm push-ups by the end of the year". Try to focus and don't grab at dozen different things - it will make goals harder to track and easier to lose interest in.
      Goals have to be numerical - you have to be able to measure them using some kind of a metric - scales, number of reps, time, whatever. They have to be realistic - I know they say "shoot for the stars and you'll land on the moon" but you'll probably land in a ditch with that kind of approach. Goals have to be actionable - you have to be able to perform exercises. And lastly, giving yourself a specific timeframe will prevent postponing your workouts indefinitely.

      Regarding your second question - unless you have some precognition powers or are able to travel into the future, your goal will require adjustments along the way - it's perfectly natural, don't be afraid to do it.

      Good luck with your training.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks for the tips! I actually though about SMART goals, but your tip regarding keeping a focus is good. I was thinking about multiple goals, but maybe 1 or 2 would be better.

        Do you think 1-2 goals with "standard" exercises like push-ups would be better (increasing the reps) or should I add 1 goal of an exercise I am currently not capable of (for example One-Arm Push

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Sgoettschkes View Post
          Thanks for the tips! I actually though about SMART goals, but your tip regarding keeping a focus is good. I was thinking about multiple goals, but maybe 1 or 2 would be better.

          Do you think 1-2 goals with "standard" exercises like push-ups would be better (increasing the reps) or should I add 1 goal of an exercise I am currently not capable of (for example One-Arm Push
          Eh, there's nothing wrong with having more goals, per se - I just found that when starting out, less is better.

          As for your second question - those two goals focus on different things. To put it simply - in every workout one progresses in three qualities:
          1)Strength - ability of the muscle to output a lot of power in a short period. (Doing a planche push-up is a feat of strength)
          2)Muscular Endurance - ability of the muscle to output power consistently over time (Doing 3,737 Pull-ups in a day is a feat of endurance)
          3)Cardiovascular Endurance - ability of your cardiovascular system to support your muscles in their work. (Mostly aerobic - think running, cycling, or endurance events like decathlons and such. You'll still need your muscles though, this is more of a support system. I guess that's why a lot of people dislike cardio days)
          (Yeah, there are additional qualities to progress like stretching or tendon strength, but those are minor in comparison)
          Now those aren't exclusive - you always progress in all of them simultaneously, the question is "where is the focus of your workout?"

          So, as you can see - your question is in the essence is "what is better - strength or endurance". The answer of course is "it depends". One has to keep in mind though, that strength is a requirement if you want to progress to more complex elements. However before starting a progression one has to have a solid foundation in basics. The problem is that "solid foundation" varies depending on who you ask.
          My opinion is that a good metric to shoot for would be something like this: 25 Push-ups / 10 Pull-ups /15 Tricep dips / 50 Squats / 10 Hanging Leg raises
          Those are all fundamental multi-joint exercises that on their own can give you an intense whole-body workout.

          But ultimately you have to decide what you want and the key is to stick with your routine and to keep progressing it.

          Good luck with your training.

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