How do you check your pace during a run?

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  • How do you check your pace during a run?

    Recently i did some more jogging/running and i probably will start Cardio Trim Run next week.
    If i jog at my default pace (which i can comfortably sustain for a long time) i'm around 7 min/km.
    Pushing myself some more and remembering to go faster and not drop to my default pace i'm at about 6:30 min/km.
    I run with an app (sportractive) on my smartphone which tracks my runs and also tells me my distance, pace and time
    every 0.5km. So if i would aim for a certain pace i only get an update after 0.5km in the worst case.
    I know that there a running watches which show you the pace (and update it constantly?).
    Is there any simple way to figure out the current pace?

  • #2
    If you run the same few routes again and again you could also set time goals for certain way points. Something like " be at the big elm tree after xy minutes" so a normal watch would do. But that not necessarily gives you more checking points than your app. I think every 0.5k usually is enough. If you check too often you only drive yourself crazy.
    I personally use a GPS watch for tracking and stearing my pace ( yes it shows a more or less constant update) but I try not to look to often for the mentioned reason.

    The app/phone combo I used in the beginning turned out to be pretty unreliable in the combination I had. I think the measurement interval was to big but it was not adjustable.
    It pretended I was faster than I really was and that annoyed me to no end, I could have lived with the other way round.
    Last edited by BusyBumbleBee; April 16th, 2017, 06:27 PM. Reason: specify unreliability of app

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    • #3
      You could do it manually with counting steps in a given time interval. First count with your default pace how much steps you do in 10 seconds, then you can do the math how far each step takes you (1km in 7min= 1000/420=2,4m/s meaning 24m divided by stepnumber in 10s is the width of your steps in your usual tempo.). The faster you run the longer are your steps but that should be insignificant for the kind of speed differences you have in a long distance jog.
      Naturally that's not super exact and may at first seem like a lot to do in your head, but in the end it basically comes down to: Am I doing enough steps in the ten seconds or not? Which number of steps you need to do should be easily remembered with a bit of experience (or even done before starting the run, once you know the number for your standard pace).

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      • #4
        BusyBumbleBee Good idea to use waypoints and time them. Thx!
        Artemi Sounds good. I will investigate my steps/10s in the next runs and try to aim for a certain pace.

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        • #5
          With running faster you have two possibilities: more steps or bigger steps, usually it will be a combination of both. From my experience my average step count ( my watch does count that too) does not vary significantly even if my pace does. I nearly always have an average of around 160steps/min give or take 5, regardless the actual pace. ( e.g. I had a step count of 156 at a pace of 8:11 a few days ago and an average step count of 160 at a pace of 7:10 today if you break that down to 10sec intervals thats not even one step difference ) I only really do significantly more steps when doing fast ( for me) intervalls, there step count goes up to around 180 at a pace around 5min/km.
          So you will have to see if this method is sensitive enough for you to work at these pace differences.

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          • #6
            what BusyBumbleBee said to step counting. my do only vary when dog and I are very fast (she pulls me with a belt an my hip, so the 'air-time' is a lot longer than a normal jogg) or at steep hills/mountains.
            Plus: i actually can't recomment running-watches either. At least not to check your pace. They are great to track your run and check your heartbeat - at that's the point I would suggest to pay more attention at. On a normal track I can guess my pace by checking my bpm-rate. - which changes if you train for getting faster, though. Training on heartbeat-rate seems to be more suited for becoming faster than 'only' checking your pace, as far as I know. But I also might be wrong

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            • #7
              BusyBumbleBee Thanks for the good explanation. I will experiment and see how much my stepcount differs with different speeds. What running watch do you have?
              mixtape Yes, i also run with a chest belt. So my apps also tracks my heartbeat.With normal track you mean a real running track like in a sports stadion? Or a section on a paved way?
              I only run on forest tracks and dirt roads. But often they are without any inclination, so checking my bpm rate as indicator for my pace would also be an option (which i only get reported
              by my app for now which is only each 0.5km). But maybe after some more running my feeling for the different speeds will improve. Currently i can't really estimate my pace.
              I more or less can guess quite well if i'm faster than 7min/km or slower

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              • #8
                By the way. How has been the weather at your place today? Here (near Augsburg) it got pretty cold again, i guess in the single-digits. Topped with some "nice" rain. So i'm now also shopping for some
                water-proof, or at least water-resistant running gear .... grml. I thought the good weather was coming.... but as i heard they also prognosed slight snow fall in the next days.
                Where has my nice spring weather gone?
                But i am determined to not let weather play a too big role in doing my runs. (Exceptions: Thunderstorms. As Britt0 pointed out, even Darebee members are sensible to electric shocks a.k.a. "Thunder struck" )

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                • #9
                  To become faster you have to run faster, like e.g. in intervall training, there hearrate plays rather a minor role, ascfar as I understood, apart from that you should give it time to drop back down between intervals. The heartbeat based slow runs are meant to build stamina and optimize the way you process your energy resources ( glycogen vs. fat), but those at least for me are slower than my "comfy" running pace, looking at pace helps me a lot there not to run faster than I should. All of that of course only plays a role if you train according to traditional training theory

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                  • #10
                    Nebulus I have a Suunto Ambit3 Sport Sapphire as I wanted something that can also track swimming, is reasonably accurate, fits my wrist AND looks nice... I'm such a girl sometimes

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by BusyBumbleBee View Post
                      To become faster you have to run faster, like e.g. in intervall training, there hearrate plays rather a minor role, ascfar as I understood, apart from that you should give it time to drop back down between intervals. The heartbeat based slow runs are meant to build stamina and optimize the way you process your energy resources ( glycogen vs. fat), but those at least for me are slower than my "comfy" running pace, looking at pace helps me a lot there not to run faster than I should. All of that of course only plays a role if you train according to traditional training theory
                      The "correct" heartbeat-rate depends - as far as I know - your max heartrate. The range ist devided into 5 sections as "sprint", "speed", "endurance", "fitness" and "easy" (or something with diffrent names and similiar meanings). And I heard your resting heartrate should affect it in some way too, but how I could not explain. Sorry! What I meant is: There is a heartrate range in which you can train best for speed. For me it would be 80%-90% of my max heartrate.
                      But indeed intervall training should be the best for building speed. As I know for relativly sure from mountainbiking

                      I think in practical it's like usual a mix from all. Intervall training with heartrate peaks in the speed or sprint range. AND of course, how's your very own body working. Never forget the no body works like the other.

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                      • #12
                        ... i'm pretty excited how my running adventure (Cardio Trim Run) will end. At least i should be water-proof soon. Just ordered some appropriate gear. So nothing can stop me ... except me.
                        No, (almost) seriously. I am committed to doing CTR (Cardio Trim Run) as my next program. And i want to finish it with < 60 min for 10km. Okay, now it's said. Please kick my ass if i don't

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                        • #13
                          Consider it as done!
                          I have to admit I only run cause of the dog. If she wouldn't love it, I'd never do it BUT or maybe that's why I have the highest respect for someone doing it regulary!

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                          • #14
                            Nebulus, good luck!

                            I invested in a running watch and am very happy I did. I hated toting my phone around with me when I was running. I have a Polar M400, which is pretty inexpensive. TomTom also makes some inexpensive running watches.

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                            • #15
                              Britt0 Thx. Also thanks for the info about your gear. I am beginning to look around w.r.t. running watches etc. So it really helps to know what me fellow bees are using.
                              You know, the phone is quite ok ... but i always need some kind of murse around me (for the phone) ...
                              ... and i haven't told you about my running thights

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